CAPTAIN EDWARD WAKEFIELD WROTE AN ARTICLE ON THE PRINCIPLES OF FLYING FROM WATER, WHICH WAS PUBLISHED IN THE AEROPLANE MAGAZINE, 10 APRIL 1913

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DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE REPLICA WATERBIRD AND THE ORIGINAL:

The original had a 7-cylinder 50hp Gnome rotary engine: the replica has a new 7-cylinder 110hp Rotec radial engine.

The replica’s propeller is bespoke, created by computer-controlled machinery.

On the original, the outer ailerons were pulled down by the control stick into the airflow: on the replica, there is a closed circuit – each moves in the opposite direction to the other.

The replica has been the subject of a design analysis to calculate the best angle to set the horizontal tail.

The original’s wing spars were made of spruce: on the replica, they are made of Douglas fir, which is stronger.

Copper nails and ruffs were used on the original’s spar webs: on the replica, they are screwed and glued.

The replica has the benefit of modern dope and fabric sewn in place, in contrast to the use of tacks on the original.

For the airframe, the replica has:-

modern glues, with glue applied where it was not originally used;

certified bracing wires;

certified turnbuckles, and

load-testing of specimens of the bamboo used for the outriggers.

The replica’s main float was built with state-of-the-art techniques, creating  increased integrity and buoyancy.

Computer modelling has enabled gathering of data and verification of the overall replica aeroplane’s design.

 

PATENT APPLICATIONS BY EDWARD WAKEFIELD

On 11 December 1911, through agents Arthur Edwards & Co., Edward Wakefield filed patents  No. 27,770 and No. 27,771 relating to the means for attachment and a stepped float, which were respectively granted on 12 September 1912 and 18 March 1913. The objects of the inventions were to ‘prevent jar when rising from and alighting upon the water and to provide an attachment of such a character that when the hydroplane is upon the water the aeroplane is suspended therefrom’ and to ‘provide an aeroplane with means for enabling it to alight, float and travel along the surface of water and to rise again therefrom’. Wakefield had thus combined features of construction in a novel way.

 

FOR DETAILS OF PATENT APPLICATIONS BY MURRAY SUETER click here